Flood experts join forces to offer Insurers inside track on multi-million pound industry issue

We have joined forces with the National Flood School to provide up-to-date guidance for insurers on tackling one of the most problematic flooding issues. Comprehensive guides have been produced offering a complete overview of the process of recovering cellars following flood damage. These areas are the most commonly affected spaces in a property likely to be damaged by water – either by a flood event or uncontrolled release of water. The subsequent recovery works can present a number of challenges – but the new guides offer a step-by-step overview of the processes involved, to help insurance professionals avoid potential pitfalls.

Two guides have been produced. The first addresses the protection of unoccupied or unprotected cellars – structures typically designed for use as storage spaces rather than living accommodation, with no protection from ground water.

The second covers occupied, basement rooms or spaces designed to remain dry. These are usually waterproof basements created during the build process or rooms converted into living or storage space.

Stephen Hodgson, Chief Executive of the PCA, says insurance companies who undertake work in occupied basements without complying to current industry guidelines may be liable for future water or damp ingress that is not connected with flooding, but the result of normal ground water conditions. He said: “Many cellars have been converted into living accommodation by builders and homeowners without specialist knowledge, in ways that do not comply to any recognised standard. In these situations, the insurer must understand that these conversions are always likely to fail. It’s a complex area and we hope the guidance we have produced will help highlight to insurers some of the potential issues they might face, and give them a framework to work from.

Both guides are free to download:

How to recover occupied or protected cellars following flooding

How to recover unoccupied or unprotected cellars following flooding