Updated Code of Practice for Remedial Timber Treatment

Updated guidance incorporates current thinking on remedial treatment of timber

PROPERTY professionals specialising in wood preservation and protection are being pointed to a valuable resource delivering expert technical guidance.PCA Code of Practice_cropped

National trade body the Property Care Association (PCA) has revised its Code of Practice on the remedial treatment of timber.

The document now incorporates current thinking on the subject and recognises legislative changes in health and safety and the use of biocides.

It can be downloaded here

The updated resource, based on current industry best practice, provides updated guidance on the in-situ treatment of fungal decay and common wood-destroying beetles.

It also features a change in emphasis by stressing the role of surveyors in identifying sources of moisture and encouraging drying out in all cases.

The revision marks the start of a root and branch review of the PCA’s library of technical guidance on dampness and timber-related subjects.

Steve Hodgson, chief executive of the PCA, said: “This document includes up-to-date information for specialists in the remedial treatment of timber and I hope it proves useful.

“It sets out methods designed to achieve satisfactory performance in properly maintained structures and guidance that can be used as a point of reference.

“Timber treatment methods have evolved considerably in recent years and it’s very important that the PCA documents this.

“The Code of Practice was last revised in 2008, so we have now updated it to include current thinking and changes in legislation.”

The document also covers general health and safety measures, provides guidance on training and acts as a valuable reference about what information should be included in inspections and reports.

There’s also a section on after-contract service along with a list of references and updates to legislation.

The PCA has also developed a new document archive as part of enhancements to its record of research and developments in remedial timber treatments. The archive can be viewed at www.property-care.org/documents/